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About Tai Chi Chuan

The Ultimate fist

A Martial Art

Tai Chi Chuan, is an ancient Chinese form of co-ordinated body movements focusing on the cultivation of internal energy ‘chi’. Its aim is to harmonise the mind, body and spirit, promoting both mental and physical well-being through softness and relaxation. When practised correctly the movements (or Form) of Tai Chi appear rhythmical, effortless and in continuous flow.

With the practice of Tai Chi the student becomes revitalised, relaxed, tolerant, self-confident, stronger and healthier in both mind and body. Unlike most forms of exercise and sport, Tai Chi does not rely on strength, force or speed, making it ideal for people of both sexes, young and old, whether strong or weak.

Tai Chi’s meditative quality enables practitioners to become more creative as they let go of being locked into old patterns and ways of doing things. A popular corporate expression is to think outside of the box, which means to look beyond the established way of doing things, to try to find new and innovative approaches, capitalizing on constantly changing tools and technology.

Even with a small amount of practise, you will find beneficial effects to your health & fitness. The mind and body relaxes, helping to combat the stresses and strains of modern society. It gently tones and strengthens your muscles. It improves your balance and posture. It improves some medical conditions, e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive disorders and muscular tension like a bad back.

Developing a high level skill in Tai Chi requires dedication and persistent correct practice. With such practice women and men can attain equal proficiency, and effortless power. The subtlety of such skill cannot be adequately described…….o n l y   f e l t.

NB: None of the information supplied should take the place of consulting with a doctor nor can we can take any responsibility for any injuries resulting from its application. Tai Chi should always be learnt under the direction of a competent instructor.  © Richard Warner